Category: Literary Collections & Anthologies

The Writings of Thomas Paine, Volume I: (1774-1779), The American Crisis

Thomas Paine (1737-1809) was an English pamphleteer, revolutionary, radical, inventor, and intellectual. He lived and worked in Britain until age 37, when he emigrated to the British American colonies, in time to participate in the American Revolution. His principal contribution was the powerful, widely-read pamphlet Common Sense (1776), advocating colonial America’s independence from the Kingdom […]

The Writings of Thomas Paine, Volume II: (1779-1792), The Rights of Man

Thomas Paine (1737-1809) was an English pamphleteer, revolutionary, radical, inventor, and intellectual. He lived and worked in Britain until age 37, when he emigrated to the British American colonies, in time to participate in the American Revolution. His principal contribution was the powerful, widely-read pamphlet Common Sense (1776), advocating colonial America’s independence from the Kingdom […]

The Writings of Thomas Paine, Volume IV: (1794-1796), The Age of Reason

Thomas Paine (1737-1809) was an English pamphleteer, revolutionary, radical, inventor, and intellectual. He lived and worked in Britain until age 37, when he emigrated to the British American colonies, in time to participate in the American Revolution. His principal contribution was the powerful, widely-read pamphlet Common Sense (1776), advocating colonial America’s independence from the Kingdom […]

Without Prejudice

Israel Zangwill (1864-1926) was an English-born humourist and writer. He dedicated his life to championing the cause of the oppressed. He wrote a very influential novel Children of the Ghetto: A Study of a Peculiar People (1892). The use of the metaphorical phrase melting pot to describe American absorption of immigrants was popularised by Zangwill’s […]

The Witch of Edmonton

The Witch of Edmonton is an English Jacobean play, written by William Rowley, Thomas Dekker and John Ford in 1621. The play-‘probably the most sophisticated treatment of domestic tragedy in the whole of Elizabethan-Jacobean drama’-is based on supposedly real-life events that took place in the village of Edmonton, outside London, earlier in the year. The […]

The Ways of Men

Eliot Gregory (1854-1915) was an American artist, critic and author. He was born in New York but he travelled to Paris to study and practice art. He specialized in drawing portraits of famous people. He also wrote short stories and critical essays. His works include: Wordly Ways and Byways (1898) and The Ways of Men […]

Vailima Letters

Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (1850-1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. He was greatly admired by many authors, including Jorge Luis Borges, Ernest Hemingway, Rudyard Kipling and Vladimir Nabokov. Most modernist writers dismissed him, however, because he was popular and did not write within […]

Utopia of Usurers and Other Essays

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) was an influential English writer of the early 20th century. His prolific and diverse output included journalism, philosophy, poetry, biography, Christian apologetics, fantasy, and detective fiction. Chesterton has been called the ‘prince of paradox. ‘ He wrote in an off-hand, whimsical prose studded with startling formulations. He is one of the […]

Ultima Thule

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) was an American poet. He wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy and was one of the five members of the group known as the Fireside Poets. He established his literary career by submitting poetry and prose to various newspapers and magazines. Between January 1824 and his graduation […]

Tortoises, and Wintry Peacock

David Herbert Richards Lawrence (1885-1930) was an English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, translations, literary criticism, and personal letters. His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialisation. In them, Lawrence confronts issues relating to […]

Thoughts Suggested by Mr. Froude’s ‘Progress’, and What is Your Culture to Me?

Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900) was an American essayist and novelist. He worked with a surveying party in Missouri; studied law at the University of Pennsylvania; practiced in Chicago; was assistant editor (1860) and editor (1861-1867) of The Hartford Press, and after The Press was merged into The Hartford Courant, was co-editor with Joseph R Hawley; […]

Tales and Sketches

Hugh Miller (1802-1856) was a self-taught Scottish geologist and writer, folklorist and an evangelical Christian. At 17 he was apprenticed to a stonemason, and his work in quarries, together with walks along the local shoreline, led him to the study of geology. In 1829, he published a volume of poems, and soon afterwards became involved […]

Stories Worth Rereading

A collection of 72 stories for children, first published in 1913. ‘All persons like stories. Children call for them from their earliest years. The purpose of this book is to provide children and youth with stories worth reading; stories relating incidents of history, missionary effort, and home and school experiences. These stories will inspire, instruct, […]

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