Category: Science Fiction

Sense From Thought Divide

Sense From Thought Divide

What is a “phony”? Someone who believes he can do X, when he can’t, however sincerely he believes it? Or someone who can do X, believes he can’t, and believes he is pretending he can?

First And Last Things

First And Last Things

Recently I set myself to put down what I believe. I did this with no idea of making a book, but at the suggestion of a friend and to interest a number of friends with whom I was associated. We were all, we found, extremely uncertain in our outlook upon life, about our religious feelings […]

The Mysterious Island

Jules Gabriel Verne (1828-1905) was a French author who pioneered the science-fiction genre. He is best known for novels such as Journey to the Centre of the Earth (1864), Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870), and Around the World in Eighty Days (1873). Verne wrote about space, air and underwater travel before air travel […]

Sybil; or, The Two Nations

Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC, FRS (born Benjamin D’Israeli) (1804-1881) was a British Conservative statesman and literary figure. He served in government for three decades, twice as Prime Minister-the first and thus far only person of Jewish parentage to do so. Disraeli’s greatest lasting achievement was the creation of the modern Conservative […]

Island of Dr. Moreau

After being rescued from shipwreck and brought to a mysterious island, Edward Prendick discovers that its inhabitants are the macabre result of experimental vivisections, the work of the visionary Dr Moreau. In the interests of scientific advancement, the doctor has transformed various beasts into strange looking man-creatures, “human in shape, and yet human beings with […]

Around the World in 80 Days

Around the World in Eighty Days is a classic adventure novel by the French writer Jules Verne, first published in 1873. In the story, Phileas Fogg of London and his newly-employed French valet Passepartout attempt to circumnavigate the world in 80 days on a £20,000 wager set by his friends at the Reform Club.

Animal Farm

George Orwell’s classic satire of the Russian Revolution is an intimate part of our contemporary culture. It is the account of the bold struggle, initiated by the animals, that transforms Mr. Jones’s Manor Farm into Animal Farm—a wholly democratic society built on the credo that All Animals Are Created Equal. Out of their cleverness, the […]

The Sleeping Bard; or, Visions of the World, Death, and Hell

Reverend Ellis Wynne (1671-1734) was a Welsh clergyman and author of one of the most important and influential pieces of Welsh language literature. Born in Lasynys Fawr near Harlech, Wynne excelled at school and entered Jesus College, Oxford in 1692. He was ordained a priest in 1704. Although a respected priest, Welsh translator and hymn […]

Philip Dru: Administrator

Edward Mandell House (1858-1938) was an American diplomat, politician, and presidential advisor. He was commonly known by the purely honorific title of Colonel House, although he had no military experience. In 1912, House published anonymously a novel called Philip Dru: Administrator. He became active in Texas politics and served as an advisor to President Woodrow […]

Off on a Comet

Jules Gabriel Verne (1828-1905) was a French author who pioneered the science-fiction genre. He is best known for novels such as Journey to the Centre of the Earth (1864), Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870), and Around the World in Eighty Days (1873). Verne wrote about space, air and underwater travel before air travel […]

The Nebuly Coat

John Meade Falkner (1858-1932) was an English novelist and poet, best known for his 1898 swashbuckler, Moonfleet. Surprisingly for a successful novelist, he was also an extremely successful businessman, becoming chairman of the arms manufacturer Armstrong Whitworth during World War I. He was born in Manningford Bruce, Wiltshire, spent much of his childhood in Dorchester […]

Man Abroad

Yes; the Ministers to Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus, and the postmasters at London, Paris, Rome, Berlin and Dublin. The asteroid consulships were laid over, and so were most of the nominations for the home offices, the post offices in South America, and the District Attorneyships of Asia and Africa. ‘ ‘Well, drop a line […]

The Lion’s Brood

(Samuel) Duffield Osborne (1858-1917) was an American author. Osborne attended the Polytechnic University of New York and was graduated from Columbia College, A.G., 1879, A. M., 1882, and from the Columbia Law School, LL. B., 1881. He was admitted to the bar in 1881 and practised in New York City, 1881-92. He was assistant secretary […]

Jack Winters’ Gridiron Chums

Mr. Charles Taft, principal owner of the mill in question, was in full sympathy with this newly aroused ambition on the part of the Chester boys to excel in athletic sports. He himself had been a devoted adherent of all such games while in college, and the fascination had never entirely died out of his […]

Hygeia: A City of Health

Sir Benjamin Ward Richardson (1828-1896) was an eminent British physician, anaesthetist, physiologist, sanitarian, and a prolific writer on medical history. He brought into use, no less than fourteen anesthetics, of which methylene bichloride is the best known, and he invented the first double-valved mouthpiece for use in the administration of chloroform. He also made known […]

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