Category: Christian Life

Some Fruits Of Solitude

Some Fruits Of Solitude

Born in 1644, William Penn’s wisdom reflects a simpler time in history when the focus was on moral principles for living. These proverbs and teachings are the product of Penn’s life, faith, and Quaker roots. An exquisite reproduction of a 1901 vintage edition, his short quotes and simple truths still resonate today. Covering 165 subjects […]

How To Take The Stress Out Of Christmas

How To Take The Stress Out Of Christmas

“Don’t Let The Stress and Worry Ruin Your Christmas, Help Is At Hand To Help You Relax and Have Fun Over The Holidays!” Do you find yourself running around at the last minute buying gifts that you forgot? Are you credit cards crying out please, no more? Those were my Christmas Pasts I feel you […]

Mystic Christianity

Mystic Christianity is a book written by Yogi Ramacharaka (a pseudonym of popular new thought author William Walker Atkinson). This work is an alternative way of looking at the history of Christianity as it is known today, and is valued by many scholars for its uniqueness and ability to provoke thought in its readers at […]

The Teaching Of Jesus

A recent writer has pointed out that sin, like death, is not seriously realized except as a personal fact. We really know it only when we know it about ourselves. The word “sin” has no serious meaning to a man, except when it means that he himself is a sinful man. And hence it comes […]

A Treatise on Good Works

Luthers transformational idea of justification by faith alone was often misunderstood and misrepresented in the early years of the Reformation. In 1520, with his Wittenberg congregation in mind, Luther set out to clarify the biblical foundation of good works. In doing so he recast the very definitions of sacred and secular both for his own […]

Thoughts on a Revelation

Thoughts on a Revelation (1862) was written by Reverend Samuel John Jerram (1815-1887), vicar of Chobham, Surrey and of Witney, Oxfordshire. ‘Few persons can have observed attentively the various phases of public opinion on religious subjects during the last twenty years or more, without noticing a growing tendency to the accumulation of difficulties on the […]

Thoughts on Religion

George John Romanes FRS (1848-1894), who also wrote as Physicus, was a Canadian-born English evolutionary biologist and physiologist who laid the foundation of what he called comparative psychology, postulating a similarity of cognitive processes and mechanisms between humans and animals. Romanes was the youngest of Charles Darwin’s academic friends, and his views on evolution are […]

Thirty Years in the Itinerancy

Reverend Wesson Gage Miller (1822-1893/4) was a Methodist clergyman born in Otsego County, N.Y.. In 1844 he moved to Wisconsin where he was appointed Methodist missionary at the Brothertown Indian Mission, and in 1845 was assigned to the Green Lake Mission. In 1850 he became pastor of the Spring Street Church in Milwaukee. He was […]

Studies in the Life of the Christian: His Faith and His Service

Henry Thorne Sell (1854-1928) was the author of: Bible Studies in the Life of Christ: Historical and Constructive (1902), Bible Studies in the Life of Paul: Historical and Constructive (1904), Studies in the Life of the Christian (1905), Studies in Early Church History (1906), Studies in the Four Gospels: The Master Books of the World […]

Sermons to the Natural Man

William Greenough Thayer Shedd (1820-1894), son of the Reverend Marshall Shedd and Eliza Thayer, was an American Presbyterian Theologian born in Acton, Massachusetts. In 1835 he began his studies at the University of Vermont. He graduated from the University of Vermont in 1839 with an interest in theology and philosophy. Thereafter, he entered Andover Theological […]

Sermons at Rugby

John Percival (1834-1918) was ordained deacon in 1860 and was offered a position as a master at Rugby School by the headmaster, Frederick Temple. In 1862, Percival was appointed the first headmaster of Clifton College in Bristol, on Temple’s recommendation. Percival made this new school into a leading public school. He became President of Trinity […]

Scientific and Religious Journal, Vol. I: January 1880, No. 1

The pyramids, temples and palaces of Thebes are monuments of the ancient intellects of our race. Great thinkers only were capable of giving to the world the Vedas, the Apollo Belvidere and the Parthenon. The arts and astronomy of Egypt harmonize very poorly with the idea that modern scientists have all the wisdom and intelligence […]

Papers on Aggressive Christianity

Catherine Booth (1829-1890) was the wife of the founder of The Salvation Army, William Booth. Because of her influence in the formation of The Salvation Army she was known as the ‘Army Mother’. Catherine was a member of the local Band of Hope and a supporter of the national Temperance Society. She began to be […]

The Master’s Indwelling

Rev. Andrew Murray (1828-1917) was a South African writer, educationist and Christian pastor. Andrew was sent to Aberdeen in Scotland for his initial education together with his elder brother, John. From there they both went to the University of Utrecht where they studied theology. The two brothers became members of Het Réveil, a religious movement […]

The Lady of the Manor: Vol 1

Mary Martha Sherwood (née Butt) (1775-1851) was a prolific and influential writer of children’s literature in nineteenth-century Britain. She is known primarily for the strong evangelicalism that coloured her early writings; however, her later works are characterized by common Victorian themes, such as colonialism and domesticity. After she married Captain Henry Sherwood and moved to […]

The Lady of the Manor: Vol 2

Mary Martha Sherwood (née Butt) (1775-1851) was a prolific and influential writer of children’s literature in nineteenth-century Britain. She is known primarily for the strong evangelicalism that coloured her early writings; however, her later works are characterized by common Victorian themes, such as colonialism and domesticity. After she married Captain Henry Sherwood and moved to […]

The Lady of the Manor: Vol 3

Mary Martha Sherwood (née Butt) (1775-1851) was a prolific and influential writer of children’s literature in nineteenth-century Britain. She is known primarily for the strong evangelicalism that coloured her early writings; however, her later works are characterized by common Victorian themes, such as colonialism and domesticity. After she married Captain Henry Sherwood and moved to […]

The Lady of the Manor: Vol 4

Mary Martha Sherwood (née Butt) (1775-1851) was a prolific and influential writer of children’s literature in nineteenth-century Britain. She is known primarily for the strong evangelicalism that coloured her early writings; however, her later works are characterized by common Victorian themes, such as colonialism and domesticity. After she married Captain Henry Sherwood and moved to […]

In Darkest England and the Way Out

Reverend William Booth (1829-1912) was a British Methodist preacher who founded The Salvation Army and became the first General. At 13 he was apprenticed to a pawnbroker and two years in was converted to ‘salvation’ and Methodism. He then read extensively and trained himself in writing and in speech, becoming a Methodist lay preacher. In […]

Human Nature and Other Sermons

Joseph Butler (1692-1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher. In 1714, Butler decided to enter the Church of England, and went to Oriel College, Oxford. After holding various other preferments, he became rector of the rich living of Stanhope. In 1736 he was made the head chaplain of King George II’s wife Caroline, […]

The Holy War

In his allegory of the Christian life The Holy War, John Bunyan portrays the happy changes that take place in the soul of the sinner who turns to Jesus Christ in true faith. The Holy War. Bunyan’s plan for his readers was for them to experience the struggles of the city of Mansoul as a […]

Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners

John Bunyan (1628-1688) was a Christian writer and preacher. He was born at Harrowden, in the Parish of Elstow, England. He wrote The Pilgrim’s Progress (1678- 1684), arguably the most famous published Christian allegory. In the Church of England he is remembered with a Lesser Festival on 30 August. Bunyan had very little schooling (about […]

The Form of Perfect Living and Other Prose Treatises

Richard Rolle (1290-1349) was an English religious writer, Bible translator, and hermit. He is known as Richard Rolle of Hampole or de Hampole, since after years of wandering he settled in his final years at Hampole, near the Cistercian nunnery. He was brought up near Pickering, and studied at the University of Oxford, supported by […]

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