Category: Science & Math

Evolution In Modern Thought

Evolution In Modern Thought

In seeking to discover Darwin’s relation to his predecessors it is useful to distinguish the various services which he rendered to the theory of organic evolution. (I) As everyone knows, the general idea of the Doctrine of Descent is that the plants and animals of the present day are the lineal descendants of ancestors on […]

The Earth As Modified By Human Action

The Earth As Modified By Human Action

The earth as modified by human action.A new edition of man and nature. This book, “The earth as modified by human action”, by George Perkins Marsh, is a replication of a book originally published before 1874. It has been restored by human beings, page by page, so that you may enjoy it in a form […]

Allan O Hume The Nests And Eggs Of Indian Birds Volume 1

The Nests And Eggs Of Indian Birds Volume 1

This fascinating text contains a detailed treatise on the nests and eggs of birds native to India. A great text sure to appeal to those with an interest in Indian birds, this antique book constitutes a worthy addition to any collection of ornithological literature and is not to be missed by discerning enthusiasts. The chapters […]

The Descent Of Man And Selection In Relation To Sex

The Descent Of Man And Selection In Relation To Sex

Charles Darwin’s Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex (1871) was the single most important European or American nineteenth-century statement that man is an integral part of the animal kingdom. As a work of science, Descent of Man mattered more, and was more coherent, rigorous, and in tune with scientific opinion than that […]

The Young Farmer: Some Things He Should Know

Thomas Forsyth Hunt (1862-1927) was an American author and professor. He studied Agriculture at the University of Illinois, receiving his B. A. in 1884 and his M. A. in 1892. In 1885 he worked as an assistant to the state entomologist of Illinois, then became Assistant Professor of Agriculture. He moved to Pennsylvania, and became […]

The Yo-semite: Its History, Its Scenery, Its Development

John Erastus Lester (1840-1900) was an American lawyer. He travelled west in 1872 in hopes of improving his health, visiting Yosemite and other areas. During his visit to Yosemite he met several pioneers, including John Muir, Galen Clark, James Hutchings, James Lamon and John Smith. After his return in late 1872, he presented a paper […]

Yosemite Trails

J. Smeaton Chase (1864-1923) has become an integral part of California literature: revered for his poignant descriptions of California landscapes. He published poetic diary entries detailing his escapades through the Sierra Nevada mountains and California desert. Chase was always drawn to the plants, animals, and Native Americans that resided along the California coast. Subsequently, in […]

The Yosemite Valley

Galen Clark (1814-1910) is known for his discovery of the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoia trees and for his role as Guardian of Yosemite National Park for 21 years. Upon his discovery of the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, he spent the majority of his time exploring the area and teaching others about the mysteries […]

Yosemite: Its Wonders and Its Beauties

John Shertzer Hittell (1825-1901) was as American author. He graduated from Miami University in 1843, then studied law, but never completed his studies. He went to California in 1849 and worked as a miner in Shasta County. In 1853, Hittell moved to San Francisco and became the editor writer of the San Francisco Daily Alta […]

A World of Green Hills

Bradford Torrey (1843-1912) was an American nature writer. His works include: Birds in the Bush (1885), A Rambler’s Lease (1889), The Foot-Path Way (1892), A Florida Sketch-Book (1894), Spring Notes from Tennessee (1896), Footing it in Franconia (1901), Friends on the Shelf (1906) and Field-Days in California (1913).

The Wonders of the Yosemite Valley, and of California

Samuel Kneeland (1821-1888) was an American author. He graduated from Harvard with an AB in 1840 and AM and MD in 1843. He was associated with a group of young Boston physicians trying to reform the medical profession. In 1862, he joined the Union army as a surgeon and was in charge of hospitals in […]

Woodward’s Graperies and Horticultural Buildings

It is less than twenty-five years since the first cold Grapery was erected on the Hudson. Since the success of the culture of the delicious varieties of the exotic Grape has been demonstrated, the number of graperies has annually increased, and during the last ten years in a very rapid ratio, until they have become […]

Winter Sunshine

John Burroughs (1837-1921) was an American naturalist and essayist. He played an important role in the evolution of the U. S. conservation movement. According to biographers at the American Memory project at the Library of Congress, John Burroughs was the most important practitioner after Thoreau of that especially American literary genre, the nature essay. By […]

Wild Life in Woods and Fields

Arabella B. Buckley (1840-1929), also known as Mrs. Fisher, was a writer and science educator. She was born in Brighton, England. At 24 she went to work as secretary to Charles Lyell, and worked for him until his death in 1875. Then she began lecturing and writing on science. She married at the age of […]

Wild Life on the Rockies

Enos Abijah Mills (1870-1922) was an American conservationist, naturalist and author, regarded as the ‘father’ of the Rocky Mountain National Park. As a child he was sent to live with relatives in Estes Park in Colorado. He spent his time discovering the area. He built a small cabin which was later turned into a museum. […]

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, and philosopher. He is best known for his book Walden (1854), a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience (1849), an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state. Thoreau’s […]

Ways of Nature

John Burroughs (1837-1921) was an American naturalist and essayist. He played an important role in the evolution of the U. S. conservation movement. According to biographers at the American Memory project at the Library of Congress, John Burroughs was the most important practitioner after Thoreau of that especially American literary genre, the nature essay. By […]

Wake-Robin

John Burroughs (1837-1921) was an American naturalist and essayist. He played an important role in the evolution of the U. S. conservation movement. According to biographers at the American Memory project at the Library of Congress, John Burroughs was the most important practitioner after Thoreau of that especially American literary genre, the nature essay. By […]

Voyage Dans L’Aures

On trouvera dans le travail qui va suivre le compte rendu fidèle d’une série d’observations recueillies au cours de la mission qui m’a été confiée par Monsieur Cambon, Gouverneur général de l’Algérie. Ce haut fonctionnaire apporte, on le sait une sollicitude particulière a l’étude des problèmes qui se rattachent a la question indigène.

Uranie

Nicolas Camille Flammarion (1842-1925) was a French astronomer and author. He was usually credited as Camille Flammarion. He was a prolific author of more than fifty titles, including popular science works about astronomy, several notable early science fiction novels, and several works about Spiritualism and related topics. He also published the magazine L’Astronomie, starting in […]

The Uses of Astronomy: An Oration Delivered at Albany on the 28th of July, 1856

First published in 1856, written by Edward Everett (1794-1865) who was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. Everett was elected to the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate, and also served as President of Harvard University, United States Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Britain, and Governor of Massachusetts before being appointed […]

Under the Apple-Trees

John Burroughs (1837-1921) was an American naturalist and essayist. He played an important role in the evolution of the U. S. conservation movement. According to biographers at the American Memory project at the Library of Congress, John Burroughs was the most important practitioner after Thoreau of that especially American literary genre, the nature essay. By […]

Under the Maples

John Burroughs (1837-1921) was an American naturalist and essayist. He played an important role in the evolution of the U. S. conservation movement. According to biographers at the American Memory project at the Library of Congress, John Burroughs was the most important practitioner after Thoreau of that especially American literary genre, the nature essay. By […]

Trees and Shrubs

Arabella B. Buckley (1840-1929), also known as Mrs. Fisher, was a writer and science educator. She was born in Brighton, England. At 24 she went to work as secretary to Charles Lyell, and worked for him until his death in 1875. Then she began lecturing and writing on science. She married at the age of […]

Time and Tide: A Romance of the Moon

Sir Robert Stawell Ball (1840-1913) was an Irish astronomer. He worked for Lord Rosse from 1865 to 1867. In 1867 he became Professor of Applied Mathematics at the Royal College of Science in Dublin. In 1874 Ball was appointed Royal Astronomer of Ireland and Andrews Professor of Astronomy in the University of Dublin at Dunsink […]

Theory of Circulation by Respiration

Emma C. (Hart) Willard (1787-1870) was an American women’s rights advocate and the pioneer who founded the first women’s school of higher education. She attended a district school at Worthington Point. Emma started teaching at the age of 17 and shortly after turning 20, received job offers from Westfield, Massachusetts, Middlebury, Vermont, and Hudson, New […]

X

Forgot Password?

Join Us

Password Reset
Please enter your e-mail address. You will receive a new password via e-mail.