Category: Nature

Allan O Hume The Nests And Eggs Of Indian Birds Volume 1

The Nests And Eggs Of Indian Birds Volume 1

This fascinating text contains a detailed treatise on the nests and eggs of birds native to India. A great text sure to appeal to those with an interest in Indian birds, this antique book constitutes a worthy addition to any collection of ornithological literature and is not to be missed by discerning enthusiasts. The chapters […]

The Descent Of Man And Selection In Relation To Sex

The Descent Of Man And Selection In Relation To Sex

Charles Darwin’s Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex (1871) was the single most important European or American nineteenth-century statement that man is an integral part of the animal kingdom. As a work of science, Descent of Man mattered more, and was more coherent, rigorous, and in tune with scientific opinion than that […]

Yosemite Trails

J. Smeaton Chase (1864-1923) has become an integral part of California literature: revered for his poignant descriptions of California landscapes. He published poetic diary entries detailing his escapades through the Sierra Nevada mountains and California desert. Chase was always drawn to the plants, animals, and Native Americans that resided along the California coast. Subsequently, in […]

The Yosemite Valley

Galen Clark (1814-1910) is known for his discovery of the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoia trees and for his role as Guardian of Yosemite National Park for 21 years. Upon his discovery of the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, he spent the majority of his time exploring the area and teaching others about the mysteries […]

Yosemite: Its Wonders and Its Beauties

John Shertzer Hittell (1825-1901) was as American author. He graduated from Miami University in 1843, then studied law, but never completed his studies. He went to California in 1849 and worked as a miner in Shasta County. In 1853, Hittell moved to San Francisco and became the editor writer of the San Francisco Daily Alta […]

The Yo-semite: Its History, Its Scenery, Its Development

John Erastus Lester (1840-1900) was an American lawyer. He travelled west in 1872 in hopes of improving his health, visiting Yosemite and other areas. During his visit to Yosemite he met several pioneers, including John Muir, Galen Clark, James Hutchings, James Lamon and John Smith. After his return in late 1872, he presented a paper […]

A World of Green Hills

Bradford Torrey (1843-1912) was an American nature writer. His works include: Birds in the Bush (1885), A Rambler’s Lease (1889), The Foot-Path Way (1892), A Florida Sketch-Book (1894), Spring Notes from Tennessee (1896), Footing it in Franconia (1901), Friends on the Shelf (1906) and Field-Days in California (1913).

The Wonders of the Yosemite Valley, and of California

Samuel Kneeland (1821-1888) was an American author. He graduated from Harvard with an AB in 1840 and AM and MD in 1843. He was associated with a group of young Boston physicians trying to reform the medical profession. In 1862, he joined the Union army as a surgeon and was in charge of hospitals in […]

Wild Life in Woods and Fields

Arabella B. Buckley (1840-1929), also known as Mrs. Fisher, was a writer and science educator. She was born in Brighton, England. At 24 she went to work as secretary to Charles Lyell, and worked for him until his death in 1875. Then she began lecturing and writing on science. She married at the age of […]

Wild Life on the Rockies

Enos Abijah Mills (1870-1922) was an American conservationist, naturalist and author, regarded as the ‘father’ of the Rocky Mountain National Park. As a child he was sent to live with relatives in Estes Park in Colorado. He spent his time discovering the area. He built a small cabin which was later turned into a museum. […]

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, and philosopher. He is best known for his book Walden (1854), a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience (1849), an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state. Thoreau’s […]

Ways of Nature

John Burroughs (1837-1921) was an American naturalist and essayist. He played an important role in the evolution of the U. S. conservation movement. According to biographers at the American Memory project at the Library of Congress, John Burroughs was the most important practitioner after Thoreau of that especially American literary genre, the nature essay. By […]

Under the Apple-Trees

John Burroughs (1837-1921) was an American naturalist and essayist. He played an important role in the evolution of the U. S. conservation movement. According to biographers at the American Memory project at the Library of Congress, John Burroughs was the most important practitioner after Thoreau of that especially American literary genre, the nature essay. By […]

Under the Maples

John Burroughs (1837-1921) was an American naturalist and essayist. He played an important role in the evolution of the U. S. conservation movement. According to biographers at the American Memory project at the Library of Congress, John Burroughs was the most important practitioner after Thoreau of that especially American literary genre, the nature essay. By […]

Trees and Shrubs

Arabella B. Buckley (1840-1929), also known as Mrs. Fisher, was a writer and science educator. She was born in Brighton, England. At 24 she went to work as secretary to Charles Lyell, and worked for him until his death in 1875. Then she began lecturing and writing on science. She married at the age of […]

Studies in the Sierra

John Muir (1838-1914) was one of the first modern preservationists. His letters, essays, and books telling of his adventures in nature, and wildlife, especially in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, were read by millions and are still popular today. His direct activism helped to save the Yosemite Valley and other wilderness areas. The Sierra […]

Spring Notes from Tennessee

Bradford Torrey (1843-1912) was an American nature writer. His works include: Birds in the Bush (1885), A Rambler’s Lease (1889), The Foot-Path Way (1892), A Florida Sketch-Book (1894), Spring Notes from Tennessee (1896), Footing it in Franconia (1901), Friends on the Shelf (1906) and Field-Days in California (1913).

Scenes of Wonder and Curiosity in California

James Mason Hutchings (1820-1902) was born in England. He emigrated to the United States in 1848, then went to California in 1849 during the Gold Rush. He became wealthy as a miner, lost it all in a bank failure, then became wealthy again from publishing. In 1855, Hutchings set out on what would be one […]

Sand Dunes and Salt Marshes

Charles Wendell Townsend (1859-1934) was one of the many physicians whose interest in natural history has led them to the closer study of birds. He was elected to membership in the American Ornithologists’ Union in 1901, and was made a Fellow in 1923. He was a valued member of the Nuttall Ornithological Club and served […]

The Renewal of Life: How and When to Tell the Story to the Young

Margaret Warner Morley (1858-1923) was a famous American biologist, educator, photographer and writer. She was well educated, graduating from New York City Normal College, now Hunter College, in 1878, then studying at Armour Institute in Chicago, now the Illinois Institute of Technology, and at Woods Hole Marine Laboratories in Massachusetts. Afterwards, she embarked on a […]

A Rambler’s Lease

Bradford Torrey (1843-1912) was an American nature writer. His works include: Birds in the Bush (1885), A Rambler’s Lease (1889), The Foot-Path Way (1892), A Florida Sketch-Book (1894), Spring Notes from Tennessee (1896), Footing it in Franconia (1901), Friends on the Shelf (1906) and Field-Days in California (1913).

Plant Life in Field and Garden

Arabella B. Buckley (1840-1929), also known as Mrs. Fisher, was a writer and science educator. She was born in Brighton, England. At 24 she went to work as secretary to Charles Lyell, and worked for him until his death in 1875. Then she began lecturing and writing on science. She married at the age of […]

Our National Parks

John Muir (1838-1914) was one of the first modern preservationists. His letters, essays, and books telling of his adventures in nature, and wildlife, especially in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, were read by millions and are still popular today. His direct activism helped to save the Yosemite Valley and other wilderness areas. The Sierra […]

The Naturalist on the Thames

Charles John Cornish (1858-1906) was a British naturalist and journalist. His works include: The New Forest (1894), Wild Animals in Captivity; or, Orpheus at the Zoo and Other Papers (1894), The Isle of Wight (1895), Life at the Zoo: Notes and Traditions of Regents Park Gardens (1897), Nights With an Old Gunner (1897), Animals at […]

Nature’s Invitation

Bradford Torrey (1843-1912) was an American nature writer. His works include: Birds in the Bush (1885), A Rambler’s Lease (1889), The Foot-Path Way (1892), A Florida Sketch-Book (1894), Spring Notes from Tennessee (1896), Footing it in Franconia (1901), Friends on the Shelf (1906) and Field-Days in California (1913).

Mountaineering in the Sierra Nevada

Clarence King (1842-1901) was an American geologist and mountaineer. First director of the United States Geological Survey from 1879 to 1881, he was noted for his exploration of the Sierra Nevada. In 1867, King was named U. S. Geologist of the Geological Exploration of the Fortieth Parallel. He spent six years in the field exploring […]

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